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E-waste

Discussion in 'Environment' started by Damo, Nov 1, 2017.

  1. Damo
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    Damo Administrator Staff Member

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    A fairly depressing topic, I admit that it hasn't really crossed my mind with what happens to old technology once it's thrown away until recently even though I'm surrounded by the stuff everyday.

    A lot of old tech ends up in landfill and as you're probably aware plastics and metals don't really degrade, at least when we throw away food it's going to rot and breakdown but throwing away a mobile phone is going to remain in the earth for a very long time not to mention the toxic chemicals it would release overtime.

    I've thrown away batteries away before in general waste bins and haven't really thought about the consequences of doing so. The point of this thread is to hopefully raise awareness of e-waste, search for local recycle centres and dispose the stuff properly.

    Here's a video I've found to give you a brief overview, here's more information from ifixit.

     
  2. rogerjolly
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    rogerjolly Active Member

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    Hi Damo,

    Some years ago I spent two months on an “underdeveloped” Caribbean island as a volunteer with an organisation that attracted people with the opportunity to help save the planet. When the time arrived for a group of us to leave, the young resident volunteer scientist gave each of us a bag of used batteries from cameras and torches etc. that she had collected from all over the island. She also gave a little talk about how grossly unfair it was for visitors from the developed world to bring such items to the island with no thought as to their disposal. She asked us to take them back to the UK to be disposed of in a country responsible for their production in the first place.

    The sad ending to the tale is that one of the group just couldn’t be bothered with carrying the weight of them and dumped them at the first bin she could find when we got to the tiny airport.

    Roger.
     
  3. Christine
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    Old electronics are certainly a big problem that I can't see decreasing in the years to come. :confused: Modern, developed society seems less concerned with 'if it's broken, fix it,' and more concerned with replacing everything with a better/latest model. E-waste also generates quite a bit of business. Part of my geography studies have briefly covered the recycling trade going on in China where folk scavenge any useful components of discarded electronics to generate a profit.
    That aside however, it goes without saying that as a species we are incredibly, astronomically wasteful.
     
  4. Damo
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    Damo Administrator Staff Member

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    Wow. So much for volunteering to save the planet, sad ending indeed. I think we ought to have some kind of stricter rules in regards of disposing recyclable rubbish, there isn't really anything enforcing recycling... Anyone can throw anything into a bin.

    I think more manufactures need to offer some kind of repair service, there's probably others but the only manufacture I know is Apple that offer battery, screen and other replacements or repair. The average user is probably going to throw away their phone once the battery becomes bad, at least with manufactures like Apple they could get them replaced which would mean one less phone in landfill.
     
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  5. Sally
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    Sally Active Member

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    Instead of enforcing more laws on the consumer how about enforcing more laws on the industries that produce this stuff. I'm fed up with being told that recycling is my responsibility, although I'm old enough to remember when it was normal to take glass bottles back for the pennies and sixpences, milk bottles, greaseproof paper, cakes in cardboard boxes, shopping bags, etc. Life before plastic was fine. Bernard Matthews (sign of the cross) produces plastic packaging for their meat that has 'not recyclable' printed on the packet. Whether this means that it will decompose or just stay there forever is not made clear.

    The law has to be enforced against the producers of the stuff, not at the poor people who have it forced on them, to deal with.
     
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  6. Damo
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    Damo Administrator Staff Member

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  7. Veganite
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    Veganite Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Where the problem lies is when you can replace an entire printer cheaper than buying new cartridges. There's so many devices like this nowadays.

    Whatever became of the TV repairman? Again, it's just easier to throw something away and replace it, rather than repair it.

    I do agree that it has to change at the source, inevitably. While crafting laws to help reduce plastics helps, everyone needs to take responsibility, especially at the source.

    I'm partly guilty here, as I just replaced a 50" TV/monitor. There's no question repairing my old one would've cost more than a new one, sadly. How does someone avoid this though? Without a monitor, none of us would be here.
     
  8. Consistency
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    Consistency Active Member Banned

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    I hear you. My father was a TV repair man / electrician before he retired. He told me that today's monitors aren't like old tube TV's in which parts were bigger and easily serviceable and that modern monitors have a lot of small diodes and they can't be replaced when they burn out.

    A way to avoid this would be to buy a quality projector instead of a monitor. Basically a projector needs the bulb replaced after so many hours and the projector isn't detrimental to our eyes like staring into a monitor(light bulb). A projector is obviously smaller and therefore less waste. Same applies when buying a new PC... Mini PC instead of regular PC.
     

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