Advertisement
  1. Don't forget to participate in our Christmas competition! Click Here! for more information. :)
    Dismiss Notice

'may contain...' and 'made in a factory that also handles...'

Discussion in 'Transitioning' started by smadams11, Nov 17, 2018.

  1. smadams11

    smadams11 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2018
    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    Bradford, England
    Ratings:
    +1 / 0 / -0
    Lifestyle/Diet:
    Vegan Newbie
    How do you deal with food that has vegan-friendly ingredients but packaging that states the food may contain traces of milk and other non-vegan-friendly foods? Same question for food packaging that says 'this food was produced in a factory that also handles: [non-vegan-friendly foodstuff]'? Do you avoid such foods?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. Lou
    Happy

    Lou Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2018
    Messages:
    890
    Location:
    San Mateo, Ca
    Ratings:
    +525 / 1 / -4
    Lifestyle/Diet:
    Vegan
    No, i don't avoid that. The warning that uses the word "may" is just for people who are violently allergic. It is the companies' way to limit their liability. After all, accidents happen. Same deal with with the second warning.

    There must be a name for this kind of issue. I see it come up a lot. But I buy my food in a grocery store that also sells meat and milk. I buy Asian takeout at a Chinese restaurant that also cooks meat.

    I think its enough to avoid the products that actually include nonvegan things in the ingredients.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. Forest Nymph
    Procrastinating

    Forest Nymph Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2017
    Messages:
    814
    Location:
    Northern California
    Ratings:
    +456 / 1 / -12
    Lifestyle/Diet:
    Vegan
    They do that for legal protection. Especially mainstream food companies, they don't want to label themselves "vegan" because they want to sell products to a wide market, but they also don't want to get sued by vegetarians or vegans (or by people with nut allergies or milk allergies, that's a thing too). Oreos by Nabisco is a good example of this, they actually state on their website it's for legal reasons, they're totally transparent about it since a lot of vegans call Oreos "accidentally vegan."

    There's also the aspect of "99.9% vegan" and that means sometimes it's easier to save money as a vegan if you purchase something on sale that might have refined sugar or unsustainable palm oil. Halloween candy and Top Ramen are examples of this. There's really no way to know if SweeTarts contain bone char, or if Top Ramen sustainably sources its palm oil, but since it's less than 1% of the overall product ingredients, it's not on the same level as purchasing a big vat of unsustainable palm oil, or even a whole bag of refined white sugar. There are vegans who avoid the "99.9%" but most of them are either affluent enough to afford it or have been vegan long enough that it's easier for them. I know as a college student there are times where I buy the plain Rice Ramen and there are definitely other times where the vegetarian Top Ramen soy sauce flavor is more within my budget. 30-40 cents per ramen cake vs. 1 dollar per ramen cake doesn't sound like much but there are weeks where it makes a difference.

    PETA actually promotes "99.9%" because it makes veganism more accessible to everyone, whether they're a college student, a working class family, or an individual living in a marginalized community where corporate products are mainly all they have to choose from.
     
    • Like Like x 2

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice